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Reid Karr
 

The Gospel of Solidarity: The future of Roman Catholic mission?

The Holy Spirit is neither present nor active in a mission in which sin and the cross of Christ are absent.

VATICAN FILES AUTHOR Reid Karr 19 APRIL 2017 11:56 h GMT+1
Photo: P. Griffin (CC)

Leonardo De Chirico’s note: I am thankful to my friend and colleague Reid Karr for contributing with this fine article to the series of Vatican Files. Reid is co-pastor of the church Breccia di Roma, Associate director of the Reformanda Initiative (www.reformandainitiative.org) and a Ph.D. candidate working on the theology of evangelization in post-Vatican II Roman Catholicism.



 



Here's a loaded question for you: What is the state of missiology today? Of course the answer to this question depends on any number of variables, such as geography, culture and religion. No doubt it is a difficult and complicated question to answer, and undertaking such a task requires courage and determination. Charles E. Van Engen has accepted this challenge and attempts to respond to this question with his aptly titled work The State of Missiology Today: Global Innovations in Christian Witness. The book represents a collection of papers presented at Fuller Theological Seminary in commemoration of the School of Intercultural Studies' 50th anniversary. The contributions focus on the School's fifty years of innovation in mission, and look to the next fifty years, thus presenting a general state of missiology today.



One of the presentations delivered for the anniversary celebration is the focus of our attention here. It is a contribution by Mary Motte, who is a sister of the Franciscan Missionary of Mary and director of the Mission Resource Center in North Providence, Rhode Island. Her article is titled "Emergence of New Paths: The Future of Mission in Roman Catholicism." Her thoughts are examined here because from an Evangelical, gospel-centered point of view, they are alarming and disconcerting. While it is true that Motte's is only one voice among many, she accurately captures a very Franciscan (in reference to the Pope) approach to mission and Roman Catholic theology, post Vatican II. Hers is a voice that has been molded by the current Pope and is a clear indication of the direction the Catholic Church is heading in. With that said, we can now ask ourselves, "So what exactly is the future of mission in Roman Catholicism?" The following is a Franciscan answer to this important question.



 



Missing Vocabulary



When considering a biblical understanding of mission, there are certain words that come to mind as being essential if one hopes to remain faithful to Scripture. For example, it would be impossible to talk about the mission and purpose of God's people in the world - past, present and future - without considering sin and its devastating effects on mankind. If we avoid sin, then we might as well avoid the cross as well, for it was at the cross where Christ paid the price for our sin. In her article Mary Motte avoids both. The word "sin" is not found once. The closest word she incorporates is "sinfulness," and is in reference to Pope Francis's awareness that he is a sinner.



The word "cross" is completely absent, and so too is the good news of what Christ accomplished there on our behalf. Not surprisingly then, the word "salvation" is also entirely absent. What about forgiveness? It is used only once, and again is a passing reference to Pope Francis's awareness that he needs forgiveness. The death and resurrection of Christ are central to the gospel and therefore to the church's mission. This gospel essential, however, is absent from Motte's writing, and the word resurrection is never used. Furthermore there is no concept of biblical redemption at all, and the word "redemption" is also nowhere to be found.



The word "grace" is used three times by Motte. With each use, however, there is no attempt to articulate how grace is meant to contribute to the future of mission in Roman Catholicism, nor what role it plays or how it should be understood. The reader encounters the word "gospel" several times, however it is never defined. Despite the lack of definition the reader can easily determine what Motte has in mind when she references the gospel, and perhaps this is why it is never clearly expounded. Whereas a biblical attempt to define the gospel would most certainly include the words discussed above, Motte's understanding of the gospel does not, so this begs this question: What exactly is the gospel according to Motte, and how does it contribute to the future of mission in Roman Catholicism?



 



An All-Encompassing Solidarity?



Instead of saturating her articulation of mission and the gospel with words such as sin, forgiveness, the cross, grace, salvation, resurrection, redemption, etc., Motte frequently employs the word "solidarity" to characterize her Franciscan concept of the gospel and the way forward for Roman Catholic mission. In short, the future of mission in Roman Catholicism is to be found in seeking solidarity. Solidarity is the "new path" that has emerged, and represents the road that ought to be followed if the Church's mission is to succeed. Whereas the words mentioned above (sin, forgiveness, etc.) are virtually absent from Motte's work, the word "solidarity" is used seven times. The following quotation provides insight into Motte's gospel of solidarity and how it relates to mission in Roman Catholicism. "Mission," she suggests, "has gradually been transformed into fidelity to the people and involves walking with them in solidarity bearing witness to the gospel of Jesus" (location 4016, Kindle version).



Mission, therefore, is fidelity to the people (people in general) and walking with them in solidarity. How, then, does one walk with another in solidarity? This is accomplished by working together on behalf of justice, peace, and the integrity of creation. It is also accomplished by being with the poor and marginalized, along with the refugees and by praying and working together with others (see location 3933). It must be noted, however, that in praying and working together Motte states that proselytism must be avoided! In her own words she says, "The enormous significance of praying and working together and of avoiding proselytism continue to be sources of energy inspired by the Holy Spirit" (locations 3933-3943). Motte suggests, therefore, that attempting to convert another to one's own faith or set of beliefs must be avoided, and that this is inspired and energized by the Holy Spirit.



For Motte, synonymous to walking in solidarity is advocating for a "global spiritual community." Citing Ewert Cousins, Motte notes that "Forces, which have been at work for centuries have in our day reached a crescendo that has the power to draw the human race into a global network and the religions of the world into a global spiritual community" (locations 3824-3834). Again, this is accomplished by confronting the "terrible suffering and losses of children, women and men in their excruciating experiences of migration, natural disasters, hunger, illness and death" (location 3834). In so doing, a "sharp awareness of the global leads us beyond boundaries to growing consciousness about human suffering" (location 3834). This represents Motte's gospel of solidarity. It is the future of mission in Roman Catholicism. This is the gospel and is, in Motte's words, "a revolution of mercy" (location 4085). What a fitting epithet to Pope Francis and his papacy.



Motte is of course right to advocate for the poor and the marginalized. She is correct that the church must confront the terrible suffering unjustly endured by so many. Justice and peace define the God of the Bible, and therefore must define His church as well. Walking in solidarity with others, even those of different religious beliefs, is to be encouraged and pursued in order to promote justice and peace and to ease the suffering of the poor and to help the countless refugees and migrants who have been displaced. These are important tasks that require solidarity and collaboration. They do not, however, ultimately define the mission of the biblical church.



 



The Heart of Mission



The mission of the church is to preach Christ crucified. The church's mission is to proclaim the good news that Christ defeated death and rose from the grave, thus securing salvation and the forgiveness of sins for those who place their faith in his atoning sacrifice. The mission of the church is to spread the good news that because of God's tremendous grace we can receive this salvation as a gift. The mission of the church is to proclaim the good news that we are all dead in our sins, but because of what God has done for us through his son Jesus Christ, and through him alone, we can be made alive again and can have eternal life. The mission of the church is to preach this message to everyone in all places, seeking to communicate the gospel in a culturally relevant and effective manner that speaks directly to the heart of the recipient.



For this mission solidarity is indeed essential, but it is a solidarity that is defined by the confession: "Christ is Lord!" Because in Christ alone our salvation is found, proselytism (i.e. preaching the gospel while being respectful of other religious views, but expecting people to turn to Christ without coercion) must never be avoided. How can it be if there is no other name under heaven given to men by which we must be saved (Acts 4:12)? If Motte's gospel of solidarity represents the future of mission in Roman Catholicism, then contrary to what she believes it is a mission that lacks the energy of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is neither present nor active in a mission in which sin and the cross of Christ are absent. The gospel is about forgiveness and salvation, it is about death and life, it is about grace and redemption. Proclaiming this good news is the mission of the church. It always has been, and it always will be.



 



Reid Karr is co-pastor of the church Breccia di Roma, Associate director of the Reformanda Initiative (www.reformandainitiative.org) and a Ph.D. candidate working on the theology of evangelization in post-Vatican II Roman Catholicism.


 

 


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