ADVERTISING
 
Monday, August 20   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 

 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 

POLL
New season
What kind of contents do you enjoy most?






SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



Peter Mead
 

Easter does not fade

The heavenly hope was, for Peter, no “pie in the sky when we die” – it was a real and life defining certain expectation.

BIBLICAL PREACHING AUTHOR Peter Mead 02 MAY 2017 09:21 h GMT+1
Photo: Samuel Zeller, Unsplash (CC)

Easter has come and gone for another year. But Easter will never fade for God’s people. 



Think about the Apostle Peter, for instance. He was a rugged fisherman called by Jesus to become one of his core followers.  He watched and experienced all that we read about in the Gospels. He was at the heart of most of the action. When it came down to it, he wanted to be there for Jesus. When it came down to it, he couldn’t make it faithfully through the night.



Then things went from bad to worse. Jesus was killed. The disciples were in hiding. Peter had not been able to say sorry for his denial of the man he so dearly loved. Saturday passed. Sunday morning came. Women came to report that the tomb was empty. Peter raced John to the tomb and that day he met the risen Christ more than once. Surely in their private conversation, Peter would have expressed his heart to Jesus over what had happened? Two weeks later, on a Galilean beach, Peter was given the chance to express publicly his love for Jesus.  He had failed, but he was not finished.



Every encounter with the risen Jesus must have thrilled their hearts, but before too many weeks had passed by Jesus returned to His Father and they waited in Jerusalem. On Pentecost, it was Peter that boldly stood to declare what was going on. Peter pronounced persuasively that the pangs of death could not keep hold of Jesus and he had risen from the dead!



Easter was very real for those who saw the real Easter. And for a few weeks, their enthusiasm is to be expected. But surely the delight must fade? Every event eventually fades, doesn’t it? Not for Peter.



Fast forward over three decades and Peter writes a letter to some dispersed and discouraged Christians in Turkey. As soon as he launches he is gushing about the reality of Easter again! Thirty-plus years and his passion remains undimmed! Peter could not help but write about the covenant mercy of God that led Him to cause us “to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead!”



Peter went on to write about that hope: an inheritance kept where it cannot die, be defiled, or disappear. The heavenly hope was, for Peter, no “pie in the sky when we die” – it was a real and life defining certain expectation. But the hope Peter spoke of was more than just the heavenly inheritance to come. It was also a present tense living hope.



How does the resurrection of Jesus shape our lives today? What do we have as well as the hope that lies ahead? Peter writes that we have perspective in the midst of challenging trials. The suffering that besets God’s people now has purpose – it proves the miracle of our faith. The suffering we endure now with faith results in greater glory to the God we look to in the midst of the trials.



As well as perspective, Peter writes that believers have an unexplainable love for Jesus. Because he rose from the dead, Jesus is not simply the object of our nostalgia, like a spiritual Elvis or JFK. Jesus is alive and that means that while we do not see him, we do love him.  As hard as it is to explain the hope that characterizes God’s people, it is even more difficult to explain the love that we have for Jesus Christ. It is a first-rate spiritual miracle for a self-absorbed and incurved human heart to be turned inside-out so that it doesn’t hate Jesus (our natural condition), but loves him from the heart!



Finally, as well as perspective and love, the believer also has inexpressible joy. When we see Jesus our joy will overflow, of course, but now, even though we do not see him, we rejoice with a joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory. True believers suffer, true believers endure, but true believers are people of joy. It comes from the perspective we have, it comes from the love that is birthed within us, it comes because Jesus has conquered the greatest enemy – death itself.



Since death is defeated we live, present tense, with a living hope, with victory-shaped perspective, with unexplainable love, and with inexpressible joy. We live, present tense, because Jesus lives, present tense. Since death is defeated, Easter must not and cannot fade for us.



Peter Mead is mentor at Cor Deo and author of several books. This article first appeared at his blog Biblical Preaching.


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - - Easter does not fade
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church

An interview with Lars Dahle, of the Steering Committee of the Lausanne Movement Global Consultation on Nominal Christianity held in Rome.

 
Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation

Are Christians called to make a difference in environmental care? What has creation care to do with "loving our neighbours"? An interview with the Global Advocacy and Influencing Director of Tearfund.

 
Kathy Bryan: Online sex trafficking in the USA Kathy Bryan: Online sex trafficking in the USA

“Prostitution is nobody’s dream,  it’s a very traumatic lifestyle”, says Kathy Bryan, director of the Elevate Academy. She mentors former victims.

 
Christians in politics? Christians in politics?

What is the role of Christians serving in politics? An interview with Auke Minnema, the new General Director of the European Christian Political Movement (ECPM).

 
Michael Ramsden: Communicating the Gospel in today’s societies Michael Ramsden: Communicating the Gospel in today’s societies

RZIM International Director Michael Ramsden responds to questions about the secularisation of Europe, the role of Christians in public leadership and the new ‘culture of victimism’.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
Sharing Jesus with World Cup fans in Moscow Sharing Jesus with World Cup fans in Moscow

A team of Steiger mission is starting conversations about the gospel in the middst of the football celebration in Russia.

 
Analysing current issues in the light of the Bible Analysing current issues in the light of the Bible

At the 2018 Apologetics Forum in Comarruga (Spain), Michael Ramsden, Pablo Martinez, Ruth Valerio and José de Segovia analysed how society and the Bible approach the issues of personal identity, integrity, sexuality, pop culture, and environmental care.

 
European “Bridges to Inclusion” gathering 2018, in Riga European “Bridges to Inclusion” gathering 2018, in Riga

The network of Christian ministries working for the inclusion of people with disabilities, celebrated its tenth continental meeting in Latvia with the participation of 12 countries.

 

 
VIDEO Video
 
How the loss of universal values led to a loss of civility How the loss of universal values led to a loss of civility

Author Bruce Little: “We have moved from a sense of responsibility to ‘my personal rights’”.

 
Being a peacemaker Being a peacemaker

Ken Sande, Founder and President of Relational Wisdom 360, develops a practical systematic theology for pursuing peace and resolving the conflicts of real life. 

 
“No one should have to leave their values at the door” “No one should have to leave their values at the door”

Author Krish Kandiah talks with politician Tim Farron about the Christian faith, politics and secularism.

 
What are the essential characteristics of a godly leader? What are the essential characteristics of a godly leader?

Clinical Pastoral Counsellor Emoke Tapolyai reflect on three characteristics Christians who have been given leadership roles should develop.

 
Reaching non-Christian ‘Christians’ Reaching non-Christian ‘Christians’

How can we reach those who call themselves ‘Christians’ but have not experienced a conversion to Christ? Forty missiologists and mission practitioners came together for a Lausanne Movement global consultation in Rome.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.