ADVERTISING
 
Friday, December 14   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 

 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 

POLL
Media
Do the media in your country usually portray evangelical Christians accurately?



SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



Peter Mead
 

Pride and the preacher

What may stir pride in the preacher? When might we be vulnerable to this great enemy?

BIBLICAL PREACHING AUTHOR Peter Mead 24 SEPTEMBER 2018 16:30 h GMT+1
Photo: Ryan Riggins. / Unsplash, CC0

One of the greatest problems for preachers is pride. It is an insidious and relentless foe that will look to creep in at every stage of a life spent in ministry. What might we be proud about?



1. Knowledge. The preacher is a public speaker who is seen as an expert. Whether you have a PhD in theology or have simply studied a couple of resources, your listeners will tend to perceive you as an expert.



And while knowledge is not a bad thing, what does knowledge do?  It puffs up.



2. Ability. Whether it is spiritual gifting, or natural charisma, or learned skill, preaching involves some ability in public speaking – something many people dread deeply.



Thus, there will be countless opportunities for pride as we speak to others.



3. Position. It may be elevation on a 12-inch podium before less than a dozen listeners, or it may be a prized pulpit for years on end, but pride in position is always knocking at the door of our hearts. 



Society may not revere the Reverend anymore, but many in our churches will certainly reinforce the honour of being a guest speaker, or a pastor, or a leader, etc.



4. Influence. Whether there is position or not, preaching implies influence. Preachers can influence lives and how they are lived. Preachers can influence emotions and create all sorts of churning in the hearts of our listeners. 



There are guilty folks convicted, there are vulnerable folks attracted, there is plenty of potential influence, both for good or for bad. Pride seems to be a lingering smell where influence is involved.



As well as what might be a source of pride, there are also some occasions that may provoke it:



A. When preparing. Do I need to invest the time in textual study? Do I need to invest the time in preparation of the sermon? Do I need to invest the time in prayer?  Maybe old notes, or old knowledge, will see me through? 



Preparation should be a season of humble study and personal application, but it can easily drift into prideful self-trust instead.



B. When criticized. How do you feel when someone pokes a hole in your message? What if they aren’t particularly educated? What if they are a younger believer than you?  What if their criticism is wrong?  What if they are right?



C. When praised. This can be worse than criticism. The best message they’ve ever heard?  Knowledge may puff up, but what then can praise do? 



Just as we need to have a plan for criticism, we also need a plan for handling praise. Both can stir profound pride problems within the preacher.



D. When ignored. What if your listeners sit through your message and then don’t even begin to apply it?  What if their lives continue as normal? What if your careful study and exegesis is considered merely your opinion? 



What if the follow up conversation is still just about the weather or a TV show when you have poured your life out for their benefit?



What else may stir pride in the preacher?  When else might we be vulnerable to this great enemy?



Peter Mead is mentor at Cor Deo and author of several books. This article first appeared on his blog Biblical Preaching.


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - - Pride and the preacher
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church

An interview with Lars Dahle, of the Steering Committee of the Lausanne Movement Global Consultation on Nominal Christianity held in Rome.

 
Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation

Are Christians called to make a difference in environmental care? What has creation care to do with "loving our neighbours"? An interview with the Global Advocacy and Influencing Director of Tearfund.

 
Kathy Bryan: Online sex trafficking in the USA Kathy Bryan: Online sex trafficking in the USA

“Prostitution is nobody’s dream,  it’s a very traumatic lifestyle”, says Kathy Bryan, director of the Elevate Academy. She mentors former victims.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
Bulgaria: Evangelicals ask government to protect religious minorities Bulgaria: Evangelicals ask government to protect religious minorities

Christians rallied in Sofia on November 18 to defend their rights. It is the second Sunday of peaceful demonstrations against a new religion draft law that could severely restrict religious freedom and rights of minority faith confessions.

 
Photos: #WalkForFreedom Photos: #WalkForFreedom

Abolitionists marched through 400 cities in 51 countries. Pictures from Valencia (Spain), October 20.

 
Photos: Reaching people with disabilities Photos: Reaching people with disabilities

Seminars, an arts exhibition, discussion and testimonies. The European Disability Network met in Tallinn.

 
Photos: Hope for Europe Photos: Hope for Europe

Unity in Diversity is the theme of the conference. Representatives of Evangelical Alliances and many other church leaders gathered in Tallinn (Estonia).

 
VIDEO Video
 
What are the benefits of the whole family being on mission? What are the benefits of the whole family being on mission?

“We’re not taking energy from my ministry when we care for our family in missional kind of ways”, says President of Josiah Venture Dave Patty.

 
“We need prayers for Bulgaria” “We need prayers for Bulgaria”

An interview with Pastor Vlady Raichinov, Vice President of the Bulgarian Evangelical Alliance.

 
The Manzanas case The Manzanas case

A short documentary about how retired pastors and widows of an evangelical denomination in Spain fight a legal battle for their pensions after the favourable ruling of the European Court of Human Rights.

 
‘Mediterráneo’ ‘Mediterráneo’

“Something will change if you have hunger and thirst for justice”, sings Spanish artist Eva Betoret in a song about the refugee crisis.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.