ADVERTISING
 
Thursday, December 12   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 

 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 

POLL
Society
Should Christians join social protests?



SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



Mark Arnold
 

What kids with special needs want to tell us and how we can help

Understand me: “If you tell me to sit up straight, now I have to use all of my brain to do just that.”

THE ADDITIONAL NEEDS BLOGFATHER AUTHOR Mark Arnold 14 NOVEMBER 2019 16:36 h GMT+1

“It’s just our brains are kinda different, so here’s what we’d like you to know about us…”



Some school children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) helped to put a video together to explain a little about themselves, suggesting some ways to understand them better and offering some ways to help them to learn and to be better included*.



These are children that we can all learn from; whether we are children’s/youth workers, parents, professionals, there is something here for us all.  





1. Movement



Understand me: “I have to move, or I really can’t pay attention.”



Help me:“Let me get up and move while I’m learning.”



Understand me: “I actually listen better when I’m rocking in my chair.”



Help me: “Let me rock, or slouch in my chair.”



Understand me: “If you tell me to sit up straight, now I have to use all of my brain to do just that.”



Help me: “Just ask me, what does your brain need right now?”



Tips: Understand that the need to move may be an overwhelming sensory need driven by under or over developed vestibular or proprioceptive senses. They can’t ‘sit still’ but might benefit from an ‘activity break’. See this blog post for more details and ways to support children/young people and their senses: 



Tools:  Provide a wobble cushion, balance board, or exercise ball etc. for a young person who needs to move.



2. Looking



Understand me: “Even though I’m not looking at you, I can still listen to what you are saying.”



Help me: “Let me look wherever I want to when you talk to me.”



Tips:  For some young people eye contact is very difficult and uncomfortable, so don’t try to force a young person to look at you when you are talking to them.  Use images, symbols, visual timetables etc. to support what you are saying, they might find this helpful.



Tools:  You can find examples of visual timetables and other visual tools here (in the ‘Resources’ folder).



3. Giving instructions and appropriate work



Understand me: “When you give me a bunch of directions, I start to think ‘I will never remember all of this!’”



Help me: “Make directions very short.”



Understand me:  “Sometimes my Mum or Dad end up doing all of my homework.”



Help me:  “Give me homework I can do all by myself.”



Understand me:  “It makes me feel sad when you tell me to try harder even though I already tried as hard as I can…”



Help me:  “No matter what, don’t take away my breaks.”



Tips:  Make instructions ‘bite sized’ and support them with images, symbols etc.  Use social stories to get complex ideas across more easily.  Provide a one-to-one helper or buddy to give support.



Rewards work better than penalties; use positive rules (“I can…”) rather than negative ones (“I must not…”).



Tools:  You can find out more about social stories here (scroll to the bottom of the page):

and positive rules here (again, scroll to the bottom):



 



One more tip



There is one more tip that these awesome kids want to share with us, and it is so important that we all understand it…



“And one more thing, our brains might be different than yours, but they’re still amazing…”



Every day is a school day!



Mark Arnold, Director of Additional Needs Ministry at Urban Saints. Arnold blogs at The Additional Needs Blogfather. This article was re-published with permission.



Video and b/w images © Brain Highways (see paragraph below). Publishing this content is not an endorsement of all of the tools and therapies offered by Brain Highways.



* Kids with a formal diagnosis, such as autism, Asperger’s, ADHD, learning disabilities, Sensory Processing Disorder, and Central Auditory Processing Disorder — along those who just need to move while learning — often find it challenging to shine in a traditional classroom.  The kids who collaborated to write and star in this “Dear Teacher” video represent such students.  So, they wanted to share with educators how their brain works and offer simple ways teachers can help.


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - - What kids with special needs want to tell us and how we can help
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels

An interview with the socio-political representative of the European Evangelical Alliance about how evangelical Christians work at the heart of the European Union.

 
Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation

Are Christians called to make a difference in environmental care? What has creation care to do with "loving our neighbours"? An interview with the Global Advocacy and Influencing Director of Tearfund.

 
Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church

An interview with Lars Dahle, of the Steering Committee of the Lausanne Movement Global Consultation on Nominal Christianity held in Rome.

 
Testimony: Wildfires near Athens Testimony: Wildfires near Athens

Nico Spies, a Christian worker in Athens, gives details about the wildfires in Greece.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
Min19: Childhood, family and the church Min19: Childhood, family and the church

The first evangelical congress on childhood and family was held in Madrid. Pictures of the event, November 1-2.

 
IFES World Assembly: ‘Messengers of Hope’ IFES World Assembly: ‘Messengers of Hope’

Students, graduates and staff of the global evangelical student movement reflected together on how the books of Luke and Acts apply to today's universities.

 
Christians at work - the missing link in fulfilling the Great Commission Christians at work - the missing link in fulfilling the Great Commission

Photos of the Lausanne Movement Global Workplace Forum, celebrated in Manila.

 
European Freedom Network Bridge 2019 conference European Freedom Network Bridge 2019 conference

Images of the fifth EFN gathering. Experts, activists, counsellors and church leaders met in Pescara, Italy.

 
VIDEO Video
 
World Evangelical Alliance General Assembly highlights World Evangelical Alliance General Assembly highlights

The World Evangelical Alliance's General Assembly 2019 in Jakarta, Indonesia, brought together 800 evangelicals from 92 countries to pray, worship and cast vision for the new decade of holistic discipleship.

 
What defines a godly leader? What defines a godly leader?

Adrian Reynolds, Associate National Director for the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches (FIEC), explains how a godly leader should be.

 
Kanye West sings to Jesus with inmates Kanye West sings to Jesus with inmates

The hip-hop artist and his gospel choir performed ‘Jesus Is King’ songs in a Houston prison. Images of the Harris County Sheriff's Office.

 
How can we encourage believers to serve Jesus with us? How can we encourage believers to serve Jesus with us?

“It is not just pastors who do ministry. When the saints are doing the ministry too, the Body of Christ is build up and grows towards maturity in the faith”, says Greg Ogden, Chairman Global Discipleship Initiative.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.