ADVERTISING
 
Wednesday, October 23   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 
Flecha
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 
 

POLL
Society
Should Christians join social protests?



SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



#toylikeme
 

Toymaker creates dolls with disabilities

In response to an online campaign by a group of parents who wanted to see a new generation of toys with greater diversity in the playroom.

SOURCES The Guardian, Huffington Post AUTHOR Evangelical Focus LONDON 27 MAY 2015 09:20 h GMT+1
#ToyLikeMe campaign modified toys to positively reflect disability. / BethMoseley Photography

Following the calling of parents of children with disabilities for a makeover of children's toys, and their campaign for large manufacturers to make the toy industry more inclusive of kids with disabilities, one British toy maker has responded.



Makies noticed the #ToyLikeMe campaign on Facebook and Twitter and started producing dolls that have walking aids, hearing aids and birthmarks.



The dolls are made from 3D printers, and have accessories such as hearing aids, walking canes, and even facial birth marks. The line plans to continue expanding to include wheelchairs in the near future.



“In just the past few days we've received hundreds of suggestions and requests for Makie dolls with the new inclusive accessories, which is just amazing, and we're rising to meet that need,” Matthew Wiggins, the company’s chief technology officer, told Today.com.



 



Makis produces disabled dolls



 



#TOYLIKEME



There are more than 770,000 children with disabilities under the age of 16 in the UK, meaning every one in 20 children has some disability, according to the Disabled Living Foundation.



Unsatisfied with what is available to buy, the campaign has been giving big-brand dolls home makeovers, modifying them so they positively reflect disability and posting those images on social media to inspire other parents, and more importantly big toy makers, to do similar.



Rebecca Atkinson, a journalist in The Guardian, wrote in the British newspaper how she decided to start the #Toylikeme campaign.



“Four weeks ago I stood back and looked at our toy box in a new light. A penny dropped. Not one plastic figure had a wheelchair, or a hearing aid, a white cane or any kind of disability at all”, she recalled.



That was very familiar for her, because, as she said: “I was one of those kids. I’d grown up wearing hearing aids and never seen myself represented anywhere. There were no deaf people on TV, in the comics I read or the toys I played with.”



 



Disney’s Tinker Bell with a cochlear implant



She then “messaged two friends with children with disabilities: Karen Newell, a former play consultant for Ragdoll Productions who has a son with visual impairment, and the deaf writer Melissa Mostyn who has a daughter with cerebral palsy”, and   “set up a Facebook page and a Twitter account and started using the hashtag #toylikeme.”



They started to make their own disabled dolls, and posted the results online. Within days we went viral as parents shared our image of Disney’s Tinker Bell with a cochlear implant, and other parents from all around the world began sharing and liking Toy Like Me at a rate of one a minute.



 



STILL SO MUCH TO DO



Besides Makis, another company called Arklu, which already produce 25% of their dolls with glasses, has also decided to make an effort to look at ways to make more disables dolls in the future its future.



As Atkinson stated: “But what about the big girls and boys in the toy world? The Legos, Mattels, Playmobils?, we have tweeted them, we have tagged them, we have talked about them, we have sent them invites. But as yet, they still haven’t come out to play.”


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - Toymaker creates dolls with disabilities
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels

An interview with the socio-political representative of the European Evangelical Alliance about how evangelical Christians work at the heart of the European Union.

 
Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation

Are Christians called to make a difference in environmental care? What has creation care to do with "loving our neighbours"? An interview with the Global Advocacy and Influencing Director of Tearfund.

 
Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church

An interview with Lars Dahle, of the Steering Committee of the Lausanne Movement Global Consultation on Nominal Christianity held in Rome.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
IFES World Assembly: ‘Messengers of Hope’ IFES World Assembly: ‘Messengers of Hope’

Students, graduates and staff of the global evangelical student movement reflected together on how the books of Luke and Acts apply to today's universities.

 
Christians at work - the missing link in fulfilling the Great Commission Christians at work - the missing link in fulfilling the Great Commission

Photos of the Lausanne Movement Global Workplace Forum, celebrated in Manila.

 
European Freedom Network Bridge 2019 conference European Freedom Network Bridge 2019 conference

Images of the fifth EFN gathering. Experts, activists, counsellors and church leaders met in Pescara, Italy.

 
VIDEO Video
 
Algerian Christians worship God as police arrives to close church Algerian Christians worship God as police arrives to close church

Video of the moment police officers enter a Protestant evangelical church near Tizi-Ouzou to close it. Church members do not stop singing, and peacefully resist later.

 
Porn exploits victims of human trafficking Porn exploits victims of human trafficking

The European Freedom Network launches a new anti-trafficking campaign: “You have no way of knowing if the porn you are looking at is from someone who chose to be there or not”.

 

 

 
What makes humans different to artificial intelligence machines? What makes humans different to artificial intelligence machines?

David Glass, Senior Lecturer in Computer Science at Ulster University (Northern Ireland) analyses whether a computer can have emotions or a conscious experience.

 
A tent of hope for Venezuelan refugees A tent of hope for Venezuelan refugees

Thousands still cross the border to Colombia every week, and many continue on foot into the interior. Christian young people have set up an aid station along the road.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.