ADVERTISING
 
Sunday, March 29   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 
Flecha
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 
 

POLL
Coronavirus
Which of these online initiatives should churches prioritise?






SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



Religious freedom
 

Chinese Christians forced to replace Jesus images with Xi Jinping

The local government poverty-relief programme aims to “transform believers in religion into believers in the party”.

SOURCES South China Morning Post AUTHOR Evangelical Focus YUGAN 16 NOVEMBER 2017 17:10 h GMT+1
Men put up a poster of Chinese President Xi Jinping in a home in Yugan. / Lvv2.com, South China Morning Post

Thousands of Christians in the impoverished county of Yugan, in rural southeast China, have been told to take down the images of Jesus and the crosses of their homes, and hang portraits of President Xi Jinping instead.



According to the South China Morning Post, more than 600 villagers “voluntarily” got rid of the religious things they had in their homes, and replaced them with 453 portraits of Xi, as part of a local government poverty-relief programme that aims to “transform believers in religion into believers in the party”.



 



LARGE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY



Located on the edge of Poyang, China’s largest freshwater lake, Yugan county in Jiangxi province is known equally for its poverty and its large Christian community.



More than 11% of its 1 million residents live below the country’s official poverty line, while nearly 10% of its population is Christian, according to official data.



 



“WE SHOULD NOT RELY ON JESUS, BUT ON THE PARTY”



Qi Yan, chairman of the Huangjinbu People’s Congress and the person in charge of the township’s poverty-relief drive, said the campaign had been running across the county since March.



It focused on teaching Christian families how much the party had done to help eradicate poverty and how much concern Xi had shown for their well-being.



 



A man take off Christian banderoles. / Lvv2.com, South China Morning Post



“Many poor households have plunged into poverty because of illness in the family. Some resorted to believing in Jesus to cure their illnesses, but we tried to tell them that getting ill is a physical thing and that the people who can really help them are the Communist Party and General Secretary Xi”, Qi said.



According to the chairman, “many rural people are ignorant. They think God is their saviour, and after our cadres’ work, they’ll realise their mistakes and think: we should no longer rely on Jesus, but on the party for help”.



 



“THERE IS NO WAY OUT”



A resident of another township in Yugan, told South China Morning Post that in recent months many of his fellow villagers had been told to remove religious artefacts from their homes.



“They all have their belief and, of course, they didn’t want to take them down. But there is no way out. If they don’t agree to do so, they won’t be given their quota from the poverty-relief fund”.



Under Xi, the party has tightened its grip on religious freedom throughout the country.



In Jiangxi, besides the removal of religious posters from people’s homes, several crosses have been removed from churches since the summer , including the one in Yugan county, continuing the trend that started in Zhejiang province.


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - Chinese Christians forced to replace Jesus images with Xi Jinping
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Jonathan Tame: Economy, looking back at the decade Jonathan Tame: Economy, looking back at the decade

The Director of the Jubilee Centre (Cambridge) analyses the impact of the financial crises on families, and the future of the workplace in a connected world, from a Christian perspective.

 
Jim Memory: Europe, looking back at the decade Jim Memory: Europe, looking back at the decade

Jim Memory analyses the main issues that have changed Europe in the 2010-2019 decade. How should Christians live in a continent that has lost its soul?

 
Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels

An interview with the socio-political representative of the European Evangelical Alliance about how evangelical Christians work at the heart of the European Union.

 
Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation

Are Christians called to make a difference in environmental care? What has creation care to do with "loving our neighbours"? An interview with the Global Advocacy and Influencing Director of Tearfund.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
Photos: European Week of Prayer Photos: European Week of Prayer

Christians joined the Evangelical Alliance Week of Prayer in dozens of European cities as local churches came together to worship God. 

 
Photos: Students at ‘Revive Europe’ Photos: Students at ‘Revive Europe’

Photos of the student conference that brought together 3,000 European Christians in Germany. ‘Revive our hearts, revive our universities, revive Europe’.

 
VIDEO Video
 
How should Christ's love inform your parenting of teenagers? How should Christ's love inform your parenting of teenagers?

Dave Patty shares about the notion of parenting children on God’s behalf.

 
What is a prayer meeting? What is a prayer meeting?

“Prayer is like a fire. One spark that someone prays should ignite a passion in someone else”. Mike Betts leads the network of churches Relational Mission.

 
Video: Highlights of ‘Revive Europe’ Video: Highlights of ‘Revive Europe’

A video summary of the student conference that gathered 3,000 in Karlsruhe, Germany. 6 days in 6 minutes.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.