ADVERTISING
 
Monday, December 9   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 

 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 
 

POLL
Society
Should Christians join social protests?



SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



 

The stele of the vultures and the prophet Habakkuk

In the Louvre Museum, Paris, there are several objects that will provide an interesting approach to biblical archaeology.

GERSON HERNÁNDEZ 13 NOVEMBER 2019 15:33 h GMT+1

If someone is interested in knowing what evidence of biblical events archeology can provide, he would love to know that in the Louvre Museum, Paris, there are several objects that will provide an interesting starting point.



In this case we will focus on a limestone stele that commemorates a battle between the Sumerian kings Lagash and Umma, which took place approximately in 2450 BC.



 





It is framed within the end of the archaic period and the beginning of the classical period. We find samples in 4 cities: Ur, Kis, Umma and Lagash, and which we place between 2990 and 2330 BC.



There are 7 fragments of this stele sculpted on both sides, which measured 180cm high, 130cm wide and 11cm deep, when it was complete. These show a low figurative relief that tells a battle and is divided into 2 horizontal records. On the top of one of the sides, we find a row of soldiers properly equipped with shields and spears. They are structured in phalanx formation, all of the same size, disposed behind King Eannatum, who is riding a cart and holds in his right hand a curved weapon formed by 3 metal bars joined together by rings. In this scene, the soldiers pass over the corpses of the army of the city of Umma, which they just defeated. While in the lower engraving, we find a series of soldiers placed diagonally and also armed with spears, which walk after their king.



 



In the illustration, the fishing net can be seen on the right side, held by the king.



On the back of the stele appears an image of the warlike god Ninurta or Ningirsu, protector of the city of Lagash. He was worshiped as a warrior and demon eliminator god, as well as a hurricane god. In this stele, this god appears sculpted celebrating the capture of the inhabitants of Umma in a large fishing net.



And it is at this point that the story of this battle takes us to the first chapter of the book of the prophet Habakkuk, in verses 15 to 17, where we read the following:



He brings all of them up with a hook;



he drags them out with his net;



he gathers them in his dragnet;



so he rejoices and is glad.



Therefore he sacrifices to his net



and makes offerings to his dragnet;



for by them he lives in luxury,



and his food is rich.



Is he then to keep on emptying his net



and mercilessly killing nations forever?



In this text, the prophet is comparing the Chaldeans, also known as Babylonians, with a great fisherman. Habakkuk says that YHVH allows the empire to take whatever people he wants, and does not conceive how his God lets Babylon show off his weapons of conquest and his victories before his gods.



The key thing is that the figure of the net, both represented in the stele and used by Habakkuk, is a very appropriate idea for the entire Middle East. The net was a symbol of military power, and appears in other figures of Babylonian art where you can see how the gods collected their enemies. Habakkuk wonders if the invasion of Judah by a foreign empire would be the solution to punish the sin of God's people. He also wonders if it would be possible to reconcile the need for punishment with the character of God.



This question should lead us to rediscover the work of Jesus on the Cross and how He was a bridge between us in our sinful state and the perfect God that waits for us.



Gerson Hernández Arizo, teacher, graduated in history. Granada (Spain).



 



Bibliography



-Carroll, D., in Comentario Bíblico De Oseas a Malaquías. Ed. Mundo Hispano. El Paso, Texas. Vol. 13. Pag. 254-255.



-Garelli, P.,  (1974). Sumer. El Próximo Oriente asiático. Barcelona: Labor. ISBN 84-335-9310-2.



-Kramer, S.N., La historia empieza en Sumer.1974



-Margueron, Jean-Claude (2002). «La época del Dinástico Arcaico». Los mesopotámicos. Fuenlabrada: Cátedra. ISBN 84-376-1477-5.



-Parrot, A., Sumer. 1964.


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - - The stele of the vultures and the prophet Habakkuk
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels

An interview with the socio-political representative of the European Evangelical Alliance about how evangelical Christians work at the heart of the European Union.

 
Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation Ruth Valerio: A lifestyle that cares about creation

Are Christians called to make a difference in environmental care? What has creation care to do with "loving our neighbours"? An interview with the Global Advocacy and Influencing Director of Tearfund.

 
Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church

An interview with Lars Dahle, of the Steering Committee of the Lausanne Movement Global Consultation on Nominal Christianity held in Rome.

 
Testimony: Wildfires near Athens Testimony: Wildfires near Athens

Nico Spies, a Christian worker in Athens, gives details about the wildfires in Greece.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
Min19: Childhood, family and the church Min19: Childhood, family and the church

The first evangelical congress on childhood and family was held in Madrid. Pictures of the event, November 1-2.

 
IFES World Assembly: ‘Messengers of Hope’ IFES World Assembly: ‘Messengers of Hope’

Students, graduates and staff of the global evangelical student movement reflected together on how the books of Luke and Acts apply to today's universities.

 
Christians at work - the missing link in fulfilling the Great Commission Christians at work - the missing link in fulfilling the Great Commission

Photos of the Lausanne Movement Global Workplace Forum, celebrated in Manila.

 
European Freedom Network Bridge 2019 conference European Freedom Network Bridge 2019 conference

Images of the fifth EFN gathering. Experts, activists, counsellors and church leaders met in Pescara, Italy.

 
VIDEO Video
 
World Evangelical Alliance General Assembly highlights World Evangelical Alliance General Assembly highlights

The World Evangelical Alliance's General Assembly 2019 in Jakarta, Indonesia, brought together 800 evangelicals from 92 countries to pray, worship and cast vision for the new decade of holistic discipleship.

 
What defines a godly leader? What defines a godly leader?

Adrian Reynolds, Associate National Director for the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches (FIEC), explains how a godly leader should be.

 
Kanye West sings to Jesus with inmates Kanye West sings to Jesus with inmates

The hip-hop artist and his gospel choir performed ‘Jesus Is King’ songs in a Houston prison. Images of the Harris County Sheriff's Office.

 
How can we encourage believers to serve Jesus with us? How can we encourage believers to serve Jesus with us?

“It is not just pastors who do ministry. When the saints are doing the ministry too, the Body of Christ is build up and grows towards maturity in the faith”, says Greg Ogden, Chairman Global Discipleship Initiative.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.