ADVERTISING
 
Saturday, May 25   Sign in or Register
 
Evangelical Focus
 
Flecha
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
FOLLOW US ON
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google +
  • Instagram
  • Soundcloud
 

Newsletter
Newsletter, sign up to receive all our News by email.
 
 

POLL
The future of Europe
Should Christians vote in the European Parliament election in May 2019?



SEE MORE POLLS
 

 
TOP 10 MOST VIEWED



Research
 

UK: “No religion is the new norm”, survey says

In the UK, 46% of adults of all backgrounds say they have no religion, according to a poll made by the Lancaster University. 99% do not take part in any religious group or form of collective worship.

SOURCES Lancaster University, Sunday Times AUTHOR Evangelical Focus LONDON 21 JANUARY 2016 12:50 h GMT+1
pulpit, bible According to the survey, British people have become less religious.

The YouGov survey, made by Lancaster University researchers, found that 46% of adults of all backgrounds say they have no religion, while 42% call themselves Christians.



The poll of 1,500 people also found that younger generations consider themselves less religious than their elders.



The majority of those aged over 60 said they were Christian but 56% of people under 40 said they had no religion. Only three in ten of those said they were Christian.



There have been a significant increase in people with no religion, considering that a similar survey in January 2013 showed that 37 per cent had no religion.



 



NO RADICAL ATHEISTS AMONG THE “NONES”



These “nones”, as they are known in the jargon, are not all fervently atheist: 40% are convinced that there is no God or “higher power”, and 5% of them are absolutely certain that he does exist.



Only 13% of nones hold anti-religious views in the style of Richard Dawkins. A quarter take part in some spiritual activity in the course of a month, and 11% call themselves “spiritual.”



But 99% do not take part in any religious group or form of collective worship, and many have a negative view of religious leaders and institutions.



 



Younger generations consider themselves less religious than their elders. / AP



 



“NO RELIGION IS THE NEW NORM”



The results have been presented this week by Linda Woodhead, professor of the sociology of religion at Lancaster University, in a lecture titled "Why no religion is the new religion."



Speaking in advance of the lecture, Professor Woodhead said: "No religion is the new norm, and there is every indication that its majority share will continue to grow”



“In terms of upbringing, no religion is particularly stick. We can see that 95% of people with a 'no religion' upbringing retain that identity, whilst 40 per cent of those with a Christian upbringing lose a Christian identity", she stated.



 



“PEOPLE HAVE BECOME LESS RELIGIOUS”



"The rise of the nones may be due not only to the fact that people have become less religious, but that the churches have become more so – more set apart from society", Woodhead affirmed.



"It used to be quite common for people to identify as Church of England simply because they were English, but now they are more [likely] to think of themselves as having no religion.”



On her Facebook she also wrote about it: "Religious sexism and homophobia is one part of the reason why we are now a 'no religion' majority country –overwhelmingly so amongst younger generations."



The Lancaster University survey also showed that the shift away from religion is "more pronounced in Britain than in other countries with a similar or related religious history."


 

 


0
COMMENTS

    If you want to comment, or

 



 
 
YOUR ARE AT: - - UK: “No religion is the new norm”, survey says
 
ADVERTISING
 
 
 
AUDIOS Audios
 
Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels Julia Doxat-Purser: 25 years of EEA office in Brussels

An interview with the socio-political representative of the European Evangelical Alliance about how evangelical Christians work at the heart of the European Union.

 
Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church Lars Dahle: Nominal Christianity, a mission field for the church

An interview with Lars Dahle, of the Steering Committee of the Lausanne Movement Global Consultation on Nominal Christianity held in Rome.

 
PICTURES Pictures
 
Glimpses of the ELF 2019 conference Glimpses of the ELF 2019 conference

Evangelical leaders from across Europe meet in Wisla (Poland) to network for mission in a range of fields. The vision is to renew the biblical church and evangelise Europe.

 
AEA Plaza opens to serve African evangelicals AEA Plaza opens to serve African evangelicals

After many years of labour, the Association of Evangelicals in Africa officially opened its new centre in Nairobi, Kenya. “Africa, your time has come!”, said the World Evangelical Alliance Secretary General Efraim Tendero.

 
‘Small churches, big potential for transformation’ ‘Small churches, big potential for transformation’

Photos of the Spanish Evangelical Alliance’s annual gathering “Idea 2019”, in Murcia. Politicians and church leaders discussed about the role of minorities in society.

 
VIDEO Video
 
God’s love and judgement in the New Testament God’s love and judgement in the New Testament

Both God’s love and judgement are intensified in the New Testament, says Paul Caopn, Chair of Philosophy and Ethics of Palm Beach Atlantic University (US).

 
A call to prayer from the streets of Venezuela A call to prayer from the streets of Venezuela

In the midst of the turmoil in Venezuela, Pastor Carlos Vielma, Vice President of the Union of Christian Churches of Venezuela, sent out an urgent plea for Christians everywhere to pray.

 
Romania: God’s Word among Roma people Romania: God’s Word among Roma people

Gypsies are one of the largest ethnic minority groups in Romania. According to 2013 estimates, the Roma groups make up 10% of the country's population, accounting for about 1.5 million people.

 
 
Follow us on Soundcloud
Follow us on YouTube
 
 
WE RECOMMEND
 
PARTNERS
 

 
AEE
EVANGELICAL FOCUS belongs to Areópago Protestante, linked to the Spanish Evangelical Alliance (AEE). AEE is member of the European
Evangelical Alliance and World Evangelical Alliance.
 

Opinions expressed are those of their respective contributors and do not necessarily represent the views of Evangelical Focus.